Trans Mountain’s engagement program reflects the diverse and varied interests of the communities and areas traversed by the pipeline, around its facilities as well as those traversed by marine tanker traffic. Trans Mountain is committed to ongoing engagement throughout the life of the TMEP, and its stakeholder engagement program is designed to foster participation from the public who have an interest in the Project.

We are building and sustaining effective relationships based on mutual respect and trust to achieve respective business and community objectives. Open, extensive and thorough engagement along the pipeline corridor and marine corridor is an important part of our Project.

Our commitment to ongoing engagement started as soon as we announced the proposed Project in May 2012. The stakeholder engagement program follows defined principles. We’ve been having wide-ranging discussions with communities, Indigenous groups, landowners and stakeholders for more than five years – and our engagement continues. Details about our activities and results to date are available below.

This open, extensive and thorough engagement is a vital component of the Project. We believe your feedback, questions, concerns and comments will help us develop a better Project.

Through these ongoing conversations, we share Project information and hear stakeholder feedback, concerns and questions. Our communications methods include;

  • Our Project website’s online engagement portal
  • Inquiries to the Project's dedicated phone line and email address
  • Face-to-face meetings, workshops and information sessions
  • Social media

We sought feedback on specific routing details, as well as environmental and other local impacts. Stakeholders provided feedback on many aspects of the Project. We shared that information with the Project team for consideration during our ongoing Project planning. We will continue to share Project updates with stakeholders and continue our communications throughout construction.

Below is a high-level outline of the stakeholder engagement opportunities we have offered since May 2012, starting with our most recent activities at the top.

Stakeholder Engagement Opportunities

On November 28, 29, and 30, 2017, Trans Mountain led three interactive workshops in Valemount, Blue River and Clearwater to help local businesses learn more about the procurement, vendor and supplier opportunities with the Trans Mountain Expansion Project. The workshop in Valemount was hosted by the Valemount Chamber of Commerce, while the Blue River and Clearwater events were hosted by Trans Mountain

Activities: Representatives from Trans Mountain, Ledcor Sicim Limited Partnership (LSLP), WorleyParsonsCord, Stantec Consulting, and WorleyParsons provided information to help businesses understand and prepare for potential procurement opportunities, assist in maximizing the economic opportunities with the Project, and create awareness about possible employment and training opportunities in North Thompson.

Materials:

Feedback: More than 100 participants from the local business community interested in procurement and vendor opportunities with the Project attended the three workshops, some of whom travelled from Barriere and Kamloops. They met Trans Mountain’s primary contractors and learnt more about the procurement process and Project timelines. Trans Mountain’s Procurement team and the General Contractors for construction spreads 3 & 4 responded to questions primarily about scope of work and scheduling.

Trans Mountain sought feedback from workshop attendees regarding how they heard about this workshop and about their businesses (business hours, number of employees, business type and contact information). The feedback allowed us to collect information to help us better understand the nature of the businesses interested in working with Trans Mountain as we plan for construction.

Most of the attendees were skilled and experienced small business owners with the capacity to provide goods, services and supplies to the Project during construction. Businesses ranged in size from large industry service providers to small businesses. Most participants became aware of this workshop through direct invitations from the Trans Mountain Expansion Project. These invitations were sent to companies who registered their interest in supplying goods and services to the Project on the Trans Mountain website as well as attendees who had attended past public forums.

Participants of the workshop were interested in the construction schedule, the scope of work in the North Thompson region and local procurement opportunities. Businesses took this opportunity to showcase their services to the General Contractors and were primarily interested in learning how to become involved in the procurement process. There were also local accommodation businesses that were inquiring about accommodation needs for workers such as hotels, RV Parks and rental accommodation. Camp development, workforce hosting and use of local goods and services were other topics of interest.

Next Steps: Trans Mountain and its contractors are committed to working with Aboriginal groups, local, regional, community and industry groups to maximize employment and business opportunities. Trans Mountain is planning similar workshops in other locations along the pipeline corridor.

On November 8, 2017, Trans Mountain led two interactive workshops, hosted by the Edmonton Chamber of Commerce and the Hinton Chamber of Commerce to help local businesses learn more about the procurement, vendor and supplier opportunities on the Trans Mountain Expansion Project.

Activities: Representatives from Trans Mountain, Midwest Pipelines Inc., WorleyParsonsCord, Stantec Consulting, SIMPCW Ledcor and WorleyParsons provided information to businesses to assist in maximizing the economic opportunities with the Project, help businesses understand and prepare for potential procurement opportunities, and create awareness about possible employment and training opportunities in Greater Edmonton, Yellowhead County and the Hinton and Edson areas.

Materials:

Feedback: More than 130 participants from the business community interested in procurement and vendor opportunities with the Project attended the workshop in Edmonton and more than 80 participants attended the workshop in Hinton. Support for the Project was expressed and attendees had many questions about timelines and procurement process. Trans Mountain’s Procurement team and the General Contractors responded to questions primarily about scope of work and scheduling. Feedback was gathered from workshop attendees. Trans Mountain sought information about participants’ businesses and how they heard about this workshop. The feedback allowed us to collect information to help us better understand the nature of the businesses interested in working with Trans Mountain as we plan for construction. Useful information gathered includes information about business hours, number of employees, business type and contact information.

Workshop attendees ranged from Trans Mountain’s long-time service providers to its existing operations to businesses that were new to Trans Mountain. Businesses ranged in size from large industry service providers to small businesses. Most participants became aware of this workshop through promotional advertising from the Chambers of Commerce and direct invitations from the Trans Mountain Expansion Project. Direct invitations were sent to companies who registered their interest in supplying goods and services to the Project on the Trans Mountain website.

Participants of the workshop were interested in the construction schedule, the scope of work for the Greater Edmonton and Yellowhead regions and local procurement opportunities. Businesses took this opportunity to showcase their services to the General Contractors and were primarily interested in learning how to become involved in its procurement process.

Next Steps: Trans Mountain and its contractors are committed to working with Aboriginal groups and local, regional, community and industry groups to maximize employment and business opportunities. Trans Mountain is planning similar workshops in other locations along the pipeline corridor.

Kiewit Ledcor TMEP Partnership (KLTP), as the General Contractor for the BC Lower Mainland including Westridge Marine Terminal (WMT), filed for a project permit in August 2017 with the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (VFPA) for the development of Site 1 – 2115 Commissioner Street in Vancouver as a temporary infrastructure site to support the construction of TMEP. Site 1 – 2115 Commissioner Street. The Project site will be developed to accommodate a temporary marine off-loading facility and laydown yard with associated employee parking and marine taxi service. The Commissioner Street Project is completely located on federal lands and waters managed by VFPA in Vancouver, BC and therefore a project permit from the port authority is required.

Activities: Trans Mountain and KLTP conducted public consultation in accordance with established VFPA guidelines for public consultation processes during the Application Review Phase as part of the Project and Environmental Review (PER) process. Consultation during the comment period was initiated through a mail out information package, online postings to the Project website and the distribution of additional material at public events.

Trans Mountain and KLTP also presented to the East Vancouver Port Lands (EVPL) Committee a week in advance of the public comment period to answer questions about the project proposal and gain some early feedback on the issues of most concern to businesses and residents of the area.

Materials:

Next Steps: Consultation Summary Report and the Consideration Report have been accepted by the VFPA and are now available below or on the VFPA website. The VFPA Project Permit review is ongoing; subject to permit approval, the Commissioner Street project is scheduled to start construction in January 2018.

On September 14, 2017, Trans Mountain led an interactive workshop, hosted by the Burnaby Board of Trade to help local businesses learn more about the procurement, vendor and supplier opportunities on the Trans Mountain Expansion Project.

Activities: Representatives from Trans Mountain and the Kiewit-Ledcor Trans Mountain Partnership (KLTP), the General Construction Contractor for the Lower Mainland portion of the Project, provided information to businesses to assist in maximizing the economic opportunities with the Project, help businesses understand and prepare for potential procurement opportunities, and create awareness about possible employment and training opportunities in Burnaby and throughout the Lower Mainland.

Materials:

Feedback: More than 90 participants from the business community interested in procurement and vendor opportunities with the Project attended the workshop. Support for the Project was expressed and many of the attendees expressed interest in attending other Business Readiness Workshops along the pipeline route to meet the other General Construction Contractors. Trans Mountain’s Procurement team and KLTP responded to questions primarily about scope of work and scheduling. Feedback was gathered from workshop attendees. Trans Mountain sought information about participants’ businesses and how they heard about this workshop. The feedback allowed us to collect information to help us better understand the nature of the businesses interested in working with Trans Mountain as we plan for construction. Useful information gathered includes information about business hours, number of employees, business type and contact information.

Workshop attendees ranged from Trans Mountain’s long-time service providers to existing operations to businesses that were new to Trans Mountain. Businesses ranged in size from large industry service providers to small business. Most participants became aware of this workshop through promotional advertising from the Burnaby Board of Trade and direct invitations from the Trans Mountain Expansion Project. Direct invitations were sent to companies who registered their interest in supplying goods and services to the Project on the Trans Mountain website.

Participants of the workshop were interested in the construction schedule, the scope of work for the Lower Mainland and local procurement opportunities. Businesses took this opportunity to showcase their services to KLTP and were primarily interested in learning how to become involved in its procurement process. Others were also interested in servicing Trans Mountain’s existing operations and inquiring about long-term business contractors after the expansion is built.

Next Steps: Trans Mountain and its contractors are committed to working with Aboriginal groups and local, regional, community and industry groups to maximize employment and business opportunities. Trans Mountain is planning similar workshops in other locations along the pipeline corridor.

On September 21, 2017, Trans Mountain hosted an information session for neighbours of our Westridge Marine Terminal, Burnaby Terminal and TMEP pipeline and route in Burnaby. This event provided an opportunity to share construction details and updates related to construction activities at Westridge Marine Terminal, Burnaby Terminal, for the Burnaby Mountain Tunnel and along the pipeline.

Activities: Subject matter experts were available to answer questions on topics of interest such as construction timing, construction impacts and mitigation measures, emergency response and more. Information below outlines what was shared at this event.

Trans Mountain hosted two events in Surrey’s Fraser Heights neighbourhood: an information session for the Fraser Valley Neighbourhood Association on June 27, 2017 that included information provided in English and Mandarin; and an update to the Fraser Heights Community Association on June 29, 2017. Trans Mountain provided an update on the Project and an opportunity to learn more about topics of interest including routing through Surrey, pipeline safety and how Trans Mountain plans to mitigate temporary construction impact in the neighbourhood. Trans Mountain also sought input about preferences for receiving construction information and notifications. Click here for information packets from both session.

Materials: The following information outlines the content that was shared at the workshops:

The information provided below outlines the content that was shared at the drop-in information session on March 7, 2017 in Hope so local residents could learn more about Project planning.

Activities: A number of Trans Mountain subject experts were available at the information session to answer questions about construction methods and mitigation measures, environmental protection plans, worker accommodation, jobs and procurement opportunities, as well as other topics of interest.

Materials:

Maps

Feedback: Ongoing dialogue and feedback assists us in understanding and addressing specific questions and concerns regarding construction and operation of the pipeline and associated facilities. Feedback was gathered through our online survey until March 20, 2017.

Next Steps: Trans Mountain and its contractors are committed to working with communities to minimize construction impacts and to maximize opportunities for Aboriginal, local and regional residents. We will continue to engage and communicate with communities before and during construction.

On March 8, 2017, Trans Mountain hosted an information session so local residents could learn more about routing, Project construction plans and schedules, as well as potential community impacts and mitigations.

Activities: A number of Trans Mountain subject experts were available at the information session to answer questions about routing, the construction process, landowner rights, protecting the Sardis-Vedder Aquifer, as well as other topics of interest. The information below outlines the content shared at this session.

Materials:

Feedback: With any major project, keeping the lines of communication open is important. We asked residents how they prefer to receive construction and Project-related information from us and how often, by filling out a survey on their communication preferences.

Next Steps: Trans Mountain continues to meet with landowners to identify and address interests and to develop land agreements for temporary use of the properties we require for construction. In March 2017, Trans Mountain filed its detailed route for Chilliwack with the NEB, which describes in detail the exact portion of the pipeline right-of-way proposed to be traversed and the names of the owners and occupiers of the land parcels.

On February 22, 2017 Trans Mountain hosted a drop-in information session in Merritt so local residents could learn more about Project construction plans and schedules, as well as potential community impacts and mitigations.

Activities:A number of Trans Mountain subject experts were available at the information session to answer questions about construction methods and mitigation measures, environmental protection plans, worker accommodation, jobs and procurement opportunities, as well as other topics of interest. The information below outlines the content shared at this session.

Materials:

·Construction – Part 1 (PDF)

·Construction – Part 2 (PDF)

·Workforce Hosting (PDF)

·Environmental Reclamation and Mitigation (PDF)

·Economic Benefits and Jobs – Part 1 (PDF)

·Economic Benefits and Jobs – Part 2 (PDF)

·Environmental Protection Plans

Maps

·Merritt (PDF)

Presentation

·Merritt (PDF)

Feedback: Ongoing dialogue and feedback assists us in understanding and addressing specific questions and concerns regarding construction and operation of the pipeline and associated facilities. Feedback was gathered at the information session and through our online survey until March 15, 2017. Topics of interest included job and procurement opportunities as well as routing and groundwater management.

Next Steps: Trans Mountain is moving forward with Project planning required to begin construction in the BC Interior in September 2017. Initial construction activities include right-of-way clearing, preparation of temporary work spaces and the initiation of trenchless river crossings. Pipeline construction will begin at Hargreaves in the North Thompson Valley and will progress southward over the 2017 – 2019 construction period.

In February 2017 Trans Mountain hosted a series of drop-in information sessions so local residents could learn more about Project construction plans and schedules, as well as potential community impacts and mitigations.

The sessions took place in Valemount on February 7, 2017, Blue River on February 8, 2017, Clearwater on February 9, 2017 and Barriere on February 21, 2017 Activities: A number of Trans Mountain subject experts were available to answer questions about construction methods and mitigation measures, environmental protection plans, worker accommodation, jobs and procurement opportunities, as well as other topics of interest. The information below outlines the content shared at these sessions.

Materials:

·Construction – Part 1 (PDF)

·Construction – Part 2 (PDF)

·Workforce Hosting (PDF)

·Environmental Reclamation and Mitigation (PDF)

·Economic Benefits and Jobs – Part 1 (PDF)

·Economic Benefits and Jobs – Part 2 (PDF)

·Environmental Protection Plans

Maps

·Village of Valemount

·Avola

·Blue River

·Clearwater/Vavenby

·Barriere

·Spread 3 includes the region from Hargreaves to Blue River (Spread 3)

·Spread 4 includes the region from Blue River to the Darfield Pump Station (Spread 4)

Presentations

·Village of Valmount

·Blue River

·Clearwater

·Barriere

Feedback: Ongoing dialogue and feedback assists us in understanding and addressing specific questions and concerns regarding construction and operation of the pipeline and associated facilities. Feedback was gathered at the events and through our online survey until March 15, 2017. There was a strong interest in jobs and procurement opportunities in all communities, and stakeholders in Blue River, Valemount, and Clearwater were specifically interested in opportunities associated with workforce hosting. Landowners in attendance at the information sessions were seeking additional information regarding construction timing and impacts.

Next Steps: Trans Mountain is moving forward with Project planning required to begin construction in the BC Interior in September 2017. Initial construction activities include right-of-way clearing, preparation of temporary work spaces and the initiation of trenchless river crossings. Pipeline construction will begin at Hargreaves in the North Thompson Valley and will progress southward over the 2017 – 2019 construction period.

On February 23, 2017, Trans Mountain hosted a drop-in information session in Kamloops so local residents could learn more about Project construction plans and schedules, as well as potential community impacts and mitigations.

Activities:A number of Trans Mountain subject experts were available at the information session to answer questions about construction methods and mitigation measures, environmental protection plans, worker accommodation, jobs and procurement opportunities, as well as other topics of interest. The information below outlines the content shared at this session.

Materials:

·Construction – Part 1 (PDF)

·Construction – Part 2 (PDF)

·Workforce Hosting (PDF)

·Environmental Reclamation and Mitigation (PDF)

·Economic Benefits and Jobs – Part 1 (PDF)

·Economic Benefits and Jobs – Part 2 (PDF)

·Environmental Protection Plans

Maps

·Kamloops North (PDF)

·Kamloops South (PDF)

·Black Pines (PDF)

Presentation

·Kamloops (PDF)

Feedback: Ongoing dialogue and feedback assists us in understanding and addressing specific questions and concerns regarding construction and operation of the pipeline and associated facilities. Feedback was gathered at the event and through our online survey until March 15, 2017. Topics of interest included job and procurement opportunities, the process for hiring and awarding contracts, and grassland reclamation.

Next Steps: Trans Mountain is moving forward with Project planning required to begin construction in the BC Interior in September 2017. Initial construction activities include right-of-way clearing, preparation of temporary work spaces and the initiation of trenchless river crossings. Pipeline construction will begin at Hargreaves in the North Thompson Valley and will progress southward over the 2017 – 2019 construction period.

In order to facilitate the Expansion Project, Trans Mountain is moving forward with the reactivation program for the 24-inch section of the pipeline that runs through Jasper National Park. As part of our ongoing engagement activities, Trans Mountain held an information session in Jasper on January 26, 2017 so local residents could learn more about our reactivation plans.

Activities: Subject matter experts were on hand to address specific topics, such as work to be undertaken to reactivate the pipeline, pipeline integrity, environmental protection plans, planned mitigation measures and emergency management.

Materials:

Feedback: Key feedback themes that arose from discussion included work to be undertaken to reactivate the pipeline, pipeline integrity, planned mitigation measures, emergency management and environmental protection plans. The safety of the public and workers is Trans Mountain’s first priority.

Next Steps: Detailed design refinements and construction planning continues. We will continue to engage and communicate regarding our activities before and during reactivation, and are committed to ensuring reactivation-related impacts pose as little disturbance as is practical to our neighbours.

On January 28, 2017, Trans Mountain hosted a drop-in information session in Edmonton so local residents could learn more about Project construction plans and schedules, as well as potential community impacts and mitigations.

Activities: Specialists and technical experts were available to provide information and answer questions on environmental protection plans, workforce hosting and plans to minimize disruption to residents during construction. The information below outlines the content shared at this session.

Materials:

Feedback: The session was an opportunity for attendees to learn more about employment and procurement opportunities and how to register for upcoming vendor supplier and workforce updates. The input and feedback gathered will help us create a stronger, safer and more responsive Project.

Next Steps: Trans Mountain is moving forward with construction planning which is expected to begin in September 2017. Trans Mountain will continue to engage neighbours along the pipeline corridor to provide information on how construction activities will be completed safely while minimizing disruption to pipeline communities.

On January 30, 2017, Trans Mountain held an information session at the Strathcona County Community Centre so community members in Sherwood Park could learn more about the detailed design refinements of the Edmonton Terminal.

Activities: Project specialists and technical experts were available to provide information and answer questions on environmental protection plans, construction impacts and mitigation. Attendees were also provided with information on employment and procurement opportunities and how to register for upcoming vendor/supplier and workforce updates. The information below outlines the content shared at this session.

Materials:

These information sessions help Trans Mountain meet information sharing and engagement requirements related to NEB conditions, as well as other permits and commitments.

Next Steps: Trans Mountain is moving forward with construction planning which is expected to begin in September 2017. Trans Mountain will continue to engage neighbours along the pipeline corridor to provide information on how construction activities will be completed safely while minimizing disruption to pipeline communities.

In January 2017, Trans Mountain hosted a series of drop-in information sessions so local residents could learn more about Project construction plans and schedules, as well as potential community impacts and mitigations.

The sessions took place in Parkland County on January 23, on January 24, 2017 in Edson and in Hinton on January 25, 2017.

Activities: Subject matter experts were on hand to address specific topics, such as routing, environmental protection plans, construction timing and planned mitigation measures. The information below outlines the content shared at these sessions.

Materials:

Feedback: The session was an opportunity for attendees to provide feedback to help us determine how we can complete construction activities safely and efficiently while minimizing disruption to our neighbours and protecting the environment. The input and feedback gathered will help us create a stronger, safer and more responsive Project.

Next Steps: Detailed design refinements and construction planning continues. We are committed to ensuring that construction-related traffic impacts pose as little disturbance as is practical to neighbouring residents, landowners, businesses and communities. New information will be provided as our work progresses.

On January 4, 2017, Trans Mountain held an information session in Burnaby so local residents could learn more about construction of the Burnaby Mountain Tunnel, Burnaby Terminal and Westridge Marine Terminal, as well as related environmental protection plans.

Activities: Subject matter experts were on hand to address specific topics, such as environmental protection plans, construction timing and planned mitigation measures. The session was also an opportunity for attendees to provide feedback on how we can complete construction activities safely and efficiently, while minimizing disruption to our neighbours and protecting the environment. The information below outlines the content shared at this session.

Materials:

·Project Overview (PDF)

·Pipeline Safety (PDF)

·Burnaby Terminal and Tunnel (PDF)

·Westridge Marine Terminal (PDF)

·Minimizing Disruption During Construction (PDF)

·Traffic Management (PDF)

·Reclamation (PDF)

·Environmental Protection Plans

Feedback: Trans Mountain addressed questions and concerns at the information session and will work to limit noise, dust and night lighting during construction to minimize disruption to neighbours. We are committed to ensuring that construction-related traffic impacts pose as little disturbance as is practical to neighbouring residents, landowners, businesses and communities.

Next Steps: Detailed design refinements and construction planning continues. Site preparations at Westridge Marine Terminal are scheduled to begin in August 2017, and at Burnaby Mountain Tunnel and the Burnaby Terminal in September 2017. We will continue to engage and communicate regarding our activities before and during construction, and we will establish a community liaison to share information and answer questions from the community. New information will be provided as our work progresses.

As the Expansion Project moves forward with planning and design, Trans Mountain continues to engage with residents and businesses in communities along the pipeline route in order to gain additional insight into how construction activities, slated to begin in September 2017, will affect our neighbours. In October 2016, Trans Mountain hosted a Coffee Chat with local businesses along the proposed TMEP route in the Lake City Industrial Neighbourhood, along East Lake Drive and Underhill Avenue in Burnaby, BC. The purpose of this engagement opportunity was to speak with neighbours about potential temporary disruptions during construction according to NEB Condition 73, traffic control plans for public roadways.

Activities Trans Mountain team and technical experts met with East Lake neighbours at a local café to discuss the Project schedule and status, the proposed route along East Lake Drive and Underhill Avenue, construction plans, proposed mitigation of potential temporary impacts and a proposed secondary access point into the Burnaby Terminal off of Gaglardi Way. Many of our neighbours expressed their support of the Project and were interested to know more about routing in the area. Trans Mountain hand-delivered more than 100 invitations to local businesses and also sent electronic invitations to those we had email addresses for. In total, 10 participants attended the event.

Materials: The following information outlines the content that was shared at the workshops: General Area Routing Map, Maps of the proposed route along Eastlake and Underhill, including Burnaby Terminal and proposed secondary access point off Gaglardi Way, Maps showing construction methodology in the area, Project Overview handout, Project Benefits Overview handout, Economic Benefits handout, Project Schedule handout

Feedback: Key feedback themes arising from the discussions included:

  • Interest in alternative pipeline routes and questions as to whether or not the line will go through the streets
  • Interest in the Expansion Project schedule and pending approval from the Federal Government
  • No concerns were expressed about the proposed Gaglardi Way secondary access point

Trans Mountain addressed all questions and concerns at the Coffee Chat and followed up with neighbours as requested.

Next Steps: Trans Mountain continues to move forward with planning, design work and permitting for the Expansion Project, and will carry on its commitment to engage with and receive feedback from neighbors and stakeholders along the pipeline route. The Project has an expected in-service date of late 2019.

As part of the Trans Mountain Expansion Project, we continue to develop our plans for construction and to mitigate construction-related impacts at Westridge Marine Terminal, Burnaby Storage Terminal and the Burnaby Mountain Tunnel. In November 2016, Trans Mountain invited representatives from neighbourhoods, organizations and local governments most impacted by construction and operations of an expanded Westridge Marine Terminal, expanded Burnaby Terminal and the Tunnel between Westridge and Burnaby Terminals to two workshops. The purpose of the workshops was to provide an overview of construction and draft environmental protection plans related to the two terminals and the tunnel; as well as to answer questions, gather input to the environmental protection plans and to identify any new concerns for consideration during construction planning.

Activities: Trans Mountain invited more than 100 representatives to the two workshops and encouraged their participation. The two workshops included one relating to the Westridge Marine Terminal and Tunnel in the morning of November 24, 2016 and a second relating to the Burnaby Terminal in the afternoon of November 24, 2016. Feedback was gathered during the day in a series of group and breakout discussions.

Materials: The following information outlines the content that was shared at the workshops: Air and Fugitive Emissions Management Plans Burnaby Terminal, Air and Fugitive Emissions Management Plans Westridge Marine Terminal, Construction Plans Update Burnaby Terminal and Tunnel, Construction Plans Update Westridge Terminal and Tunnel, Environmental Protection Plans Burnaby Terminal and Tunnel, Environmental Protection Plans Westridge Marine Terminal and Tunnel, Marine Environment Plans, Noise Management Plans, Traffic Management Burnaby Terminal, Traffic Management Westridge Marine Terminal, Watercourse Burnaby Terminal and Weed and Vegetation Management Plan.

Feedback: Key themes communicated to Trans Mountain from the workshop include air quality monitoring including noise and emissions; monitoring birds for impacts from construction noise and air quality particularly seaward of Westridge Marine Terminal and at Maplewood Flats in North Vancouver, BC; convening a meeting with Lower Fraser Valley Air Quality Coordinating Committee (LFVAQCC) in Q1 2017 to review key air quality topics; and using innovation in noise control methods.

Interest was expressed in making water quality information available to the public; the overall integrity of the streams near the terminal; risk mitigation for tunnel construction related to hydrogeology of Burnaby Mountain; and in considering innovation and new approaches for managing weeds.

Suggestions for habitat offsets include considering ways to discourage colonization of dock structures with marine invasive species; integrating habitat enhancements at the proposed foreshore wall at the expanded Westridge Marine Terminal; and soft shore (vs. rock reef) habitat offsets.

Participants also expressed interest in traffic management measures for construction access to and from Burnaby Terminal, along Shellmont Street and proposed Gaglardi access during construction; in providing access for shore power to tankers; in understanding Complaints Management Process and understanding and input to Community Liaison role; and in ensuring use of local suppliers during construction.

Next Steps: Trans Mountain continues to refine its construction and mitigation plans relating to the two terminals in Burnaby and the tunnel based on detailed engineering, design and construction planning, studies and from feedback received through this and other engagement activities. More detail on these plans will be shared in Q1-3 2017 with additional opportunities to provide feedback and ask questions.

Trans Mountain continues to explore ways to provide a variety of opportunities for stakeholders to share feedback on the proposed Project – especially new tools using the internet. During May 2015, Trans Mountain launched two online surveys and a webinar. Both gave stakeholders an opportunity to provide feedback regarding the Project, whether they attended an in-person event or preferred to participate online. The new engagement tools were promoted on the Trans Mountain website home page, on the Talk Trans Mountain page and in the Engagement section.

Activities: Trans Mountain launched two online surveys and hosted two webinars. These online engagement opportunities provide stakeholders a digital forum to offer feedback regarding the Project, in addition to attending an in-person event.

Feedback: Concerns raised through online engagement forums ranged from construction impacts and locations, notification of construction activities, reclamation, workforce, local benefits and on broader topics such as climate change, economic benefits, safety and emergency response, health impacts, environmental protection, pipeline maintenance, sensitive environmental areas and marine traffic. Detailed concerns from each online forum can be found in Section 1.21 of Consultation Update No. 4.

Next Steps: Feedback was forwarded to the Project team to be considered and incorporated into planning and design, as appropriate.

Emergency planning and response have been key areas of concern in both pipeline and marine communities. To address this concern, we initiated a series of Emergency Management Stakeholder Workshops with regional districts (BC) and counties (Alberta) all along the proposed pipeline corridor.

Activities: EMSW, Part 1 invitees included local community emergency managers and first responders, health and safety officials and other officials or agency representatives with responsibility for emergency management in the region. We provided attendees an overview of existing operations and the proposed Project. We also provided an introduction to the Emergency Management planning process. Existing Emergency Response Plans were made available at each workshop.

Feedback: Concerns raised at the sessions included: third-party strikes to the pipeline, leak detection, fire plans, natural hazard impacts, vandalism or terrorism, explosion, public safety and awareness, increased emergency training and resources needs, oil transport via rail, communication strategies in case of evacuation, location specific spill response times, coordination and capacity of response, water contamination and remediation and associated costs.

Next Steps: Feedback received at the sessions was shared with the participants within two weeks of the workshop and will be incorporated into a summary report on recommendations once all EMSW, Part 1 events have been completed.

Trans Mountain continued to initiate Technical Working Groups with local governments. These groups provide an opportunity for our technical teams to work directly with relevant local government staff to refine our engineering, routing and construction plans and to address issues as they arise.

Activities: Technical Working Groups were initiated in communities throughout BC in late 2015. We will continue to meet with these groups on an as-needed basis throughout the planning and construction phases as needed.

Feedback: Comments collected through our initial Technical Working Group meetings can be found in Section 1.23 of Consultation Update No. 4.

Next Steps: Additional Technical Working Group meetings will continue as needed.

Trans Mountain hosted a series of meetings focusing on gathering feedback for the development of a Socio-Economic Effects Monitoring Plan (SEEMP).

Activities: SEEMP meetings were successfully held in seven communities including Merritt, Clearwater, Valemount and Kamloops, British Columbia, and in Edmonton, Edson and Jasper, Alberta. The meetings provided stakeholders with an opportunity to discuss and comment on the SEEMP approach to be implemented during the construction phase of the proposed Project and to further discuss interests and concerns related to construction of the proposed Project.

Feedback: Concerns raised at the meetings ranged from accommodations, local purchase of goods and services, impacts on local policing, emergency and health services, community preparedness, traffic, impacts to tourism and ongoing point of contact through construction. Detailed concerns from each community can be found in Section 1.19 of Consultation Update No. 4.

Next Steps: The feedback collected will be considered in the development of the Socio-Economic Effects Monitoring Plan.

Trans Mountain continued to provide accurate and timely information, as well as gathering stakeholder feedback through a series of Neighbourhood Information Sessions.

Activities: Neighbourhood Information Sessions were successfully held in three communities in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia. The session provided stakeholders with an update on the proposed Project and information related to environment, reclamation and construction impacts.

Feedback: Concerns raised at the Information Sessions ranged from environmental impacts, construction impacts and timing, emergency response, tanker traffic and safety, procurement and economic benefits. Detailed concerns from each community can be found in Section 1.20 of Consultation Update No. 4.

Next Steps: Feedback was forwarded to the Project team to be considered and incorporated into planning and design, as appropriate.

Trans Mountain continued its EMSW, Part 2, which met stakeholder interests by reviewing scenario discussions exploring local sequence of events and local resources requirements in the event of an oil spill in a community. EMS W, Part 2 also provided an opportunity to practice our Emergency Management Plans and to develop a working relationship with pertinent stakeholders involved in initial emergency response.

Activities: An EMSW, Part 2 was successfully held in the Tri-Cities area (Coquitlam, Port Moody and Port Coquitlam) and we invited emergency first responders and planners. Three communities asked to postpone the discussion to spring 2015 and three communities either declined or were unable to meet with us.

Feedback: Concerns raised at the workshops ranged from environmental impact (fish, water bodies, wetlands, water quality and quantity), disaster planning and emergency spill response. Detailed tables of concerns from each community can be found in Section 1.15.12 of Consultation Update No. 4.

Next Steps: EMSW, Part 3 is planned for 2016. The focus of Part 3 is to collect new data and input from communities, Aboriginal groups and various levels of government on the enhancement of the existing plan to meet the new system.

Trans Mountain hosted EPP workshops providing participants with an opportunity to give feedback on the EPPs and proposed mitigation measures. Participants were provided an overview of Trans Mountain’s ESA, as filed with the NEB, and an overview of proposed mitigation measures designed to reduce or avoid impacts. We sought feedback regarding proposed mitigation measures using local/technical knowledge.

Activities: EPP workshops were successfully held in four communities in BC’s Lower Mainland including Fraser River/Coquitlam, Brunette River/Burnaby, Surrey Bend Park/Surrey and Langley. EPP workshops provided participants the opportunity to discuss reclamation and environmental mitigation, watercourse crossings and fish habitat, caribou habitat, air quality, wildlife, critical habitat, municipal and local parks and protected areas, wetlands, vegetation (i.e., rare plants and ecological communities, rare species), land use (i.e., forestry, agriculture, recreation), soil and soil productivity and marine fish/mammals/birds.

Feedback: Concerns raised at the workshops ranged from environmental impacts (i.e., fish, birds, trees, watercourse crossings, wetlands, water quality and quantity, sensitive areas), reclamation, noise, routing, pipeline construction timing and techniques. Detailed tables of concerns from each community can be found in Section 1.18 of Consultation Update No. 4.

Next Steps: Feedback gathered will be reported as outlined in NEB Draft Conditions and commitments made by Trans Mountain in responses to Information Requests.

We hosted a series of Open Houses and Information Sessions in our BC Interior region that focused on building community readiness for potential employment related to our proposed Project.

Activities: We hosted six public Open Houses and three Information Sessions with Secondary Schools in the BC Interior region from November to December 2014. The local newspaper ran a story on employment and training opportunities. Third-party support for the Project was demonstrated when we partnered with Post-Secondary Education Institutions in the hosting of events.

Feedback: Interests and concerns expressed included: employment and training, economic benefits, procurement or business opportunities and community capacity building. Full details of feedback gathered can be found in Section 1.18 of Consultation Update No. 3.

Next Steps: Continue to host Jobs & Training Sessions, and participate in other local events such as Career Fairs, in communities along the pipeline corridor.

Our Facilities Application identified a proposed pipeline corridor and in some cases proposed alternative pipeline corridors. Following the December 2013 filing, we continued our work to optimize the route and reduce impacts to people and the environment through a combination of technical and environmental studies, engagement activities and on-the-ground field work. To collect stakeholder feedback, we offered online opportunities to provide comments on the areas where we were considering an optimization of the proposed route.

Activities: An online survey and feedback from requesting comments from stakeholders on routing optimization and the proposal to returning a section of our existing pipeline to service, was available on the our website. Supporting materials were provided for visitors to review and provide comment on.

Feedback: 85 feedback forms were received with comments on main topics of land, air, water and human activity and land use. Details of the comments can be found inSection 1.5.7 of Consultation Update No. 2.

Next Steps: Feedback collected was forwarded to the project team to be considered and incorporated in to planning and design, as appropriate.

Our Facilities Application identified a proposed pipeline corridor and in some cases proposed alternative pipeline corridors. Following the December 2013 filing, we continued our work to optimize the route and reduce impacts to people and the environment through a combination of technical and environmental studies, engagement activities and on-the-ground field work. To keep stakeholders informed we conducted a series of workshops in communities where we were considering an optimization of the proposed route.

Activities: Workshops were held in west Edmonton, Wabamun, Fraser Valley/Chilliwack, Coquitlam, Surrey, Langley and Burnaby. The workshops provided stakeholders with an opportunity to receive updated Project information, to review and provide feedback on area-specific revisions to the proposed pipeline corridor, since filing the NEB Application in December 2013.

Feedback: Key issues and concerns were documented around themes of land, air, water and human activity and land use. Detailed feedback by community can be found inSection 1.5.5 of Consultation Update No. 2.

Next Steps: Feedback was forwarded to the project team to be considered and incorporated in to planning and design, as appropriate.

We held Twitter Town Halls, via our Twitter channel @transmtn, that provided stakeholders an opportunity to submit questions on a specific topic to our Project experts.

Activities: Two Twitter Town Halls were held, one on October 14, 2014 that focused on marine safety and one on October 27, 2014 that focused on pipeline safety. We created the hashtag #AskTransMtn for use in all tweets and asked those participating to use it. This made tweets searchable for anyone to see.

Feedback: During the marine safety Twitter Town Hall, there were approximately 2,100 tweets and retweets using the hashtag #AskTransMtn, and during the pipeline safety Twitter Town Hall, there were approximately 80 tweets and retweets using the hashtag #AskTransMtn.

Next Steps: All questions were either answered during the event, or as a follow-up if we couldn’t get to a question during the one-hour event. All tweets were consolidated into a Storify post and posted to our blog.

We conducted a series of workshops to: i) share information on our proposed approach for undertaking a BC Parks Stage 2 Boundary Adjustment Proposal; ii) share information on the proposed route along our study corridor; iii) identify local environmental and socio-economic topics of concern; and iv) identify potential parks benefits.

Activities: At the workshops, we provided attendees with a proposed overview of the selected study corridor in each park, sought feedback of attendees on particular concerns relating to human activity and environment in the parks as well as discussed parks benefits, in break-out groups.

Feedback: Feedback from the workshops is included in the tables of key topics of interest or concern in Section 1.6 of Consultation Update #2.

Next Steps: Feedback received at these sessions and afterwards, was considered in setting the scope for the BC Parks Stage 2 Boundary Adjustment Application. Event reports and proposed benefits were submitted to BC Parks for consideration against Park benefit priorities.

We continued discussions with representatives of Jasper National Park and Mount Robson Provincial Park regarding the reactivation of an existing segment of our pipeline through the parks.

Activities: On August 12, 2014 we met with representatives of Jasper National Park and Mount Robson Provincial Park. The meeting included a site visit to determine next steps for remediation.

Feedback: Attendees raised the following issues:

  • location of valves;
  • mitigation plans for natural hazard sites;
  • level of disturbance to cultural resources sites compared to the 1950s as well as ancillary development such as access, power sites; and
  • comprehensiveness of Aboriginal engagement.

Next Steps: We will continue to provide information to the public and interested stakeholders, so that they know what to expect during reactivation activities.

We hosted four Telephone Town Halls in targeted BC communities. A computerized auto dialer notified stakeholders of the upcoming Telephone Town Halls and provided them with information on how to participate. We answered as many questions from callers, as time permitted.

Activities: Prior to each of the Telephone Town Halls, outbound calls were placed within the six targeted BC communities of Burnaby, Coquitlam-Surrey, Vancouver and Abbotsford-Chilliwack. In total, more than 20, 000 people participated over the course of the four sessions. Participants were welcomed by a moderator and introduced to Kinder Morgan Canada President, Mr. Ian Anderson, who provided an initial update on the status of the Project. Participants could then ask questions of Mr. Ian Anderson. At the conclusion of each Telephone Town Hall, stakeholders were invited to remain on the line and leave a voice message with questions or alternatively, they could contact us directly at [email protected] or toll-free at 1-866-514-6700.

Feedback: Each call covered a number of topics. Full recordings and select clips from each event are available on our blog:

Next Steps: Topics raised on the call were communicated to the regional engagement specialists and appropriate project team members to incorporate into future engagement efforts and project planning.

Our Facilities Application identified a proposed pipeline corridor and in some cases proposed alternative pipeline corridors. Following the December 2013 filing, we continued our work to optimize the route and reduce impacts to people and the environment through a combination of technical and environmental studies, engagement activities and on-the-ground field work. To keep stakeholders informed we conducted a series of open houses in communities where we were considering an optimization of the proposed route.

Activities: We hosted five Open Houses that provided stakeholders with an opportunity to receive updated Project information, to review and provide feedback on area-specific revisions to the proposed pipeline corridor since filing the NEB Application in December 2013.

Feedback: Key issues and concerns were documented around themes of land, air, water and human activity and land use. Detailed feedback by community can be found inSection 1.5.6 of Consultation Update No. 2.

Next Steps: Feedback was forwarded to the project team to be considered and incorporated in to planning and design, as appropriate.

During an open comment period from August 25 to October 12, 2014, visitors to our website were invited to review our draft BC Parks Stage 2 Boundary Adjustment Application and complete a comment form. A link to a BC Parks hosted comment form was also provided for those who wanted to comment directly to BC Parks.

Activities: On November 13, 2014, we filed a Stage 2 Boundary Adjustment Application with BC Parks that reported on our engagement activities described in Consultation Update No. 2, as well as information gathered during the open comment period.

Feedback: A copy of our BC Parks Stage 2 Boundary Adjustment Application can be found here.

Next Steps: BC Provincial government review and recommendation currently underway.

We hosted a Telephone Town Hall following the Burnaby Mountain Protests. Telephone Town Hall participants were welcomed by a moderator and introduced to Kinder Morgan Canada President, Mr. Ian Anderson, who provided an opening statement. We answered as many questions from callers as time permitted.

Activities: Outbound calls were placed to Burnaby households and to 134 people who had registered via our online registration form, resulting in close to 5,000 people participating in the Telephone Town Hall. At the conclusion of each Telephone Town Hall, stakeholders were invited to remain on the line and leave a voice message with questions and or alternatively, they could contact us directly at [email protected] or toll-free at 1-866-514-6700.

Feedback: The call covered a number of topics. A full recording and select clips from the event are available on our blog.

Next Steps: A survey was posted online asking the public to tell us how they wanted to continue the conversation and on what topics. The top three ways stakeholders want to provide feedback are: community open houses, online feedback forums and panel discussions. We will develop engagement activities that incorporate the most popular techniques and the topics chosen through the online survey.

We initiated Technical Working Groups with local governments in Q3/Q4 2014. These groups provide an opportunity for our technical teams to work directly with relevant local government staff to refine our engineering, routing and construction plans and to address issues as they arise.

Activities: Technical Working Groups were initiated in communities throughout our Lower Mainland/Fraser Valley region in late 2014. We will initiate Technical Working Groups in the Interior BC and Alberta regions in Q2/Q3 2015. We will continue to meet with these groups on an as-needed basis throughout the planning and construction phases as needed.

Feedback: Comments collected through our initial Technical Working Group meetings up to December 2014 can be found in Section 1.13 of Consultation Update No. 3.

Next Steps: Additional Technical Working Groups will be initiated in the Interior BC and Alberta Regions in Q2/Q3 2015, and meetings will continue as needed.

We met with local governments in British Columbia to review potential construction impacts to municipal parks and seek their feedback on how the parks are used by members of the community.

Activities: Discussions were held with six local governments in British Columbia in 2014.

Feedback: The details of the Municipal Parks and Recreation Areas discussions are summarized in Table 1.12-1 to 1.12-4 of Consultation Update No. 3.

Next Steps: Discussions will continue with additional opportunity for feedback during engagement activities planned for spring 2015.

The proposed pipeline corridor for the expansion traverses some of Lac du Bois Grasslands Protected Area.

Activities: On September 24, 2013, we provided a tour of the Lac du Bois Grasslands area to key stakeholders. Attendees met at the Holiday Inn in Kamloops, British Columbia for a briefing and were then driven to the proposed right-of-way for the Project for a walking tour of the grasslands area. Following the identification of concerns and discussion with subject matter experts, attendees were provided route maps.

Feedback: Several stakeholders cautiously expressed support for the pipeline passing through the Lac du Bois Grasslands, provided an adequate net benefit to the park could be demonstrated by Trans Mountain. Some stakeholders were uncomfortable with the proposed right-of-way passing through the Lac du Bois Grasslands and preferred the alternate route through the community of Westsyde.

Next Steps: Engagement activities related to our BC Parks Stage 2 Boundary Adjustment Application will be completed in spring 2014 for Finn Creek Provincial Park, North Thompson Provincial Park, Lac du Bois Protected Area, Coquihalla Summit Recreation Area and Bridal Veil Falls Provincial Park. Engagement will follow the Provincial Protected Area Boundary Adjustment Policy, Process and Guidelines (British Columbia Ministry of Environment 2010).

As a follow-up to a series of open houses held in 2012, we hosted routing open houses to share updated Project information and review area-specific routing changes with affected communities and stakeholders.

Activities: Routing Open Houses were held in Edmonton, AB, Hinton, AB, Kamloops, BC, Abbotsford, BC and Burnaby, BC. At our Abbotsford Open House, in addition to the standard display boards and technical representatives, we also provided a bus tour of the Sumas Pump Station and Terminal.

Feedback: Participants provided feedback on environment, routing and socio-economic topics. Section 1.7.10 of Volume 3A of the Facilities Application provides tables with each concerns expressed at each open house, unique to each community.

Next Steps: Information gathered was forwarded to the project team to be considered and incorporated in to planning and design, as appropriate.

Community workshops provided local stakeholders with an opportunity to receive updated Project information and provide feedback on issues and concerns related to routing and environmental studies. These workshops were attended by stakeholders that had knowledge of community interests, the environment, economic activity, recreation and land use.

Activities: Seventeen workshops were help in pipeline communities between April and June 2013. Participation included municipal representatives, local community representatives, business groups, recreational representatives, and guides and outfitters. The materials we provided to participants at the workshops included a Project introduction, presentations on land, air, water, and human activity as well as an exit survey. Information presented in the community workshops was made available online the day following each session and was live for three weeks for additional comments from participants and the general public. Newspaper, radio and online advertising was used to promote the online engagement opportunity.

Feedback: Local environmental knowledge helped to identify issues of concern in our study areas, possible mitigation measures, and possible compensation or net benefit initiatives to consider as part of our overall Project proposal. Participants provided specific feedback on land, air, water and human use and activities. Section 1.7.9 of Volume 3Aof the Facilities Application provides tables with each concerns expressed at each workshop, unique to each community.

Next Steps: Information gathered was forwarded to the project team to be considered and incorporated in to planning and design, as appropriate.

EMSW, Part 2 met stakeholder interests by reviewing scenario discussions that explored a local sequence of events and local resources requirements in the event of an oil spill in a community. EMSW, Part 2 also provided an opportunity to utilize use our Emergency Management Plans in practice, and to develop a working relationship with pertinent stakeholders involved in initial emergency response.

Activities: EMSW, Part 2 were successfully held in 20 communities and we invited the same municipal, regional districts (BC) and counties (AB) to participate in scenario discussions, as we did in EMSW, Part 1. Three communities asked to postpone the discussion to spring 2015 and three communities either declined or were unable to meet with us.

Feedback: Concerns raised at the workshops ranged from incident notification, to first responder capacity and coordination, to interest in being involved in reassessment of control points and incorporating local knowledge into plans. Detailed tables of concerns from each community can be found in Section 1.7.2 of Consultation Update No. 3.

Next Steps: EMSW, Part 3 is planned for 2015. The focus of Part 3 is to collect new data and input from communities, Aboriginal groups and various levels of government on the enhancement of the existing plan to meet the new system.

Trans Mountain met with a number of stakeholders from various organizations to discuss fisheries offsets related to the Westridge Marine Terminal.

Activity: Seven organizations attended the Westridge Marine Workshop we hosted on July 14, 2014.

Feedback: Stakeholders provided feedback on legacy impacts and offsets. Details of the feedback can be found in Table 1.6.2-4 of Consultation Update No. 3.

Next Steps: We will continue to engage with local communities, government, Aboriginal groups and stakeholders on environmental mitigation and offset measures related to the construction and operation of the Westridge Marine Terminal expansion.

In recognition of the potential for public inconvenience and temporary disruption associated with pipeline construction, we have been pursuing Community Benefit Memorandums of Understanding (MOU) with communities along the Project corridor that would provide direct benefits to communities should the proposed expansion be approved and constructed. The Community Benefit Program provides for benefits in communities along the pipeline corridor that are over and above the financial compensation for construction and operation of the pipeline.

Activities: Through our ongoing engagement initiatives, priority areas for community benefit investments were identified with input from local and regional governments, and other local stakeholders. We offered to meet with each municipality where we operate to discuss potential community benefits. As of March 19, 2015 we have signed 12 agreements with 15 communities for a total dollar commitment of more than $4.8 million.

Feedback: Conversations on community benefits are at different stages within each community.

Next Steps:We will continue Community Benefit conversations with communities along the line, and are committed to providing direct benefits to those communities along the proposed corridor. We will announce each agreement as it is signed through 2015.

Two segments of our existing 24-inch pipeline are proposed to be reactivated as part of the Trans Mountain Expansion Project.

Activities: Face-to-face meetings, presentations and workshops with stakeholders between Hinton, AB and Hargreaves, BC, and between Darfield, BC and Black Pines, BC were held to hear concerns, questions and suggestions about the reactivation.

Feedback: Concerns were expressed about access requirements for dig sites, safety and emergency responses, confusion that a third line was going to be built through Jasper National Park and Mount Robson Provincial Park, associated power line work, water sourcing for the required hydrostatic testing and chemical storage at Jasper Pump Station. Stakeholders also inquired about the product shipped in the pipeline, the age of the pipeline to be reactivated, impacts to pressure within the pipe in case of power loss, testing process prior to reactivating and condition of the existing line.

Next Steps: Meetings scheduled to discuss mitigation methods or changes to project plans to address concerns and solicit any additional concerns.

Given that the Project traverses distinct geographic regions that include diverse ecosystems ranging from grasslands to rainforest and marine, we opted to host ESA workshops to gather information that informed our Environmental and Socio-Economic Assessment studies. Input gathered from stakeholders was considered by our environmental assessment team in designing their field studies.

Activities: We hosted six ESA Workshops to gather feedback from local and regional subject matter experts including municipal, federal and provincial governments, local Environmental Non-Government Organizations (ENGOs), and other environmental interest groups. Four workshops were held in pipeline corridor communities and two workshops were held in marine corridor communities. In response to stakeholder interests in the Fraser Valley, we also hosted an agricultural-specific workshop that recognized their specific interests. We opted to invite participants to the ESA Workshops based on their specific technical and/or local knowledge, which would enable them to provide input into the design of an ESA. At the workshops, we provided attendees with a proposed overview of our ESA approach for the Project and sought feedback from attendees on particular modules of the ESA including air, land, and water. The Agricultural Workshop in Abbotsford focused on soil and agriculture. Additional input was solicited online for two weeks after each workshop.

Feedback: Participants provided feedback on air quality, water quality and quantity, fish and fish habitat, wildlife, wetlands, vegetation, socio-economic topics, engineering, stakeholder engagement, climate change, geology, soils, Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge and many other topics. Section 1.7.8 of Volume 3A of the Facilities Application provides an overview of the concerns expressed at each workshop.

Next Steps:Feedback received at these sessions, and afterwards, was shared with the relevant environmental disciplines and was considered in setting the scope and methodologies for the Project’s ESA.

Economic benefits presentations held in communities along our proposed route emphasized opportunities for local benefits through procurement, jobs and workforce spending. Local businesses have been interested in information on economic opportunities for some time, and this series of presentations helped to address that need. Most events were delivered in partnership with local chambers of commerce.

Activities: Sixteen events were held along the proposed corridor from Edmonton, AB to Burnaby, BC. Over 1,300 people attended the events. Attendees were encouraged to register via our website, to be notified about procurement and employment opportunities with the Project.

Feedback: 205 companies expressed interest in procurement opportunities and 127 people expression interested in employment opportunities through registration forms on the website. Response from the leadership and membership of local Chambers was generally positive. A theme of local opportunities emerged quickly in our conversations with local businesses and economic development groups, and on traditional and social media.

Next Steps: Provide community level information about procurement and employment opportunities as they become more solidified in 2015 and 2016.

We held open houses to inform stakeholders of our proposed plans for terminal expansions in Burnaby and Edmonton and to share our proposed footprint. At the terminal open houses we shared new information such as technical specifications, safety and configuration and sought stakeholder feedback on our proposed plans.

Activities: Two open houses were held, one that focused on the expansion of our Burnaby Terminal and one that focused on the expansion of our Edmonton Terminal. Information was presented and technical experts were available to answer questions and solicit feedback. Materials such as 3D models, routing maps and factsheets were available at each open house.

Feedback: Participants provided feedback on emergency response, security, employment opportunities, human health, environment, corporate responsibility, liability, operations and management, noise, air quality, routing, safety, stakeholder engagement and socio-economic topics. Section 1.7.11 of Volume 3A of the Facilities Application summarizes the concerns expressed at each open house.

Next Steps: Information gathered was forwarded to the project team to be considered and incorporated in to planning and design, as appropriate.

In this phase of engagement we sought to introduce the Project to the broader public and to continue to identify stakeholders with an interest in the Project, local community interests and concerns, appropriate engagement methods for communities and aimed to provide accurate and timely Project information.

Activities: Thirty-seven open houses were held between Edmonton, AB and Sooke, BC with approximately 2,200 people attending over the course of the events. The Open Houses were structured as drop-in events where stakeholders could gain information and ask questions about the Project. Our Project information was displayed on large poster boards positioned throughout each venue. Corporate leadership and technical experts including representatives from marine biological science, maritime navigation and industry, environment, routing, geotechnical, regulatory, operations, stakeholder engagement, and media relations were on hand to answer questions, and receive comments and concerns from attendees. Attendees were encouraged to complete feedback forms; 250 completed forms were received. The form was designed to collect participants’ feedback on the following:

  • Quality and completeness of information provided;
  • Topics where more information was necessary;
  • Topics of particular interest/concern;
  • Important topics for the environmental assessment;
  • Important topics for the socio-economic assessment;
  • Preferred communication methods for project information

Additionally, feedback was solicited online through a feedback form and discussion forums specific to each community.

Feedback: The top areas of interest or concern identified by stakeholders were:

  • Pipeline safety
  • Pipeline monitoring and spill response
  • Marine safety
  • Marine spill response
  • Natural environment
  • Pipeline routing
  • Socio-economic benefits and impacts (particularly employment and procurement)

We gathered stakeholder’s questions, concerns and feedback on:

  • The scope and design of the environmental and socio-economic studies being conducted along the pipeline corridor and the marine corridor
  • Local and provincial economic benefits and impacts
  • Important local considerations for planning, constructing and operating the proposed line and facilities
  • Routing in areas where it is not practical for the new line to follow the existing pipeline right-of-way
  • Format and content of the engagement process
  • How the proposed Project could be improved.

Next Steps: We gained valuable information about what stakeholders felt they still needed information about and which concerns they felt still need to be addressed. This input influenced the design of the proposed Project and our Application to the National Energy Board (NEB). Read a full report of how this feedback was incorporated into project planning, with specifics starting on page 46.

Engagement Principles

The following principles have been and will continue to be used to guide the development and execution of the stakeholder engagement program:

Accountability – Address issues as they emerge. We believe that effective problem-solving and mitigation strategies can be identified through engagement with stakeholders.

Communication – Facilitate the involvement of stakeholders, listen and gather input, and work collaboratively to resolve concerns. Use multiple channels for communication to meet the communication needs of diverse stakeholder groups.

Local focus – Seek local input and understanding of the region, its people, the environment, and reflect local values and attitudes in communications with stakeholders.

Mutual benefit – Seek solutions to challenges that result in shared benefits for all interests.

Relationship building – Instill confidence in the public by remaining committed to being a good neighbour with the goal of establishing and maintaining positive, long‑term relationships with stakeholders.

Respect – Respect individual values, recognize the legitimacy of concerns, and value the stakeholder input.

Responsiveness – Use input and, where feasible, provide timely feedback to stakeholders on how their input has affected plans and decisions.

Shared process – Design our engagement and communication program based on public input, taking into consideration various stakeholder group interests, knowledge levels, time, and preferred method of engagement.

Sustainability – Report on a triple bottom line of social, environmental and economic concerns raised, and identify how these concerns might be addressed.

Timeliness – Initiate engagement processes as early as possible to provide adequate time for stakeholders to assess information and provide input.

Transparency – Commitments made to stakeholders will be documented and carried out. When we are unable to act on input, we will provide an explanation.

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