In Canada, the area covering 30 metres (100 feet) from the centre of the pipeline, and often extending beyond the right-of-way, is known as the prescribed area. Under Canadian regulations, any ground disturbance activities in the prescribed area require a permit from us. We apply the same stringent measures to our assets in the Puget Sound area of Washington state.

Before you begin any ground disturbance work, contact your local One Call serivce at least three business days in Canada (two in Washington state). If your proposed work is near our pipeline, a Trans Mountain representative will call you back within three business days in Canada (two in Washington state) to discuss your proposed work and if required, meet with you on-site to identify the exact location of the pipeline. This service is provided at no cost to you.

Learn more on our permitting page here.

Under Canadian regulation, any ground disturbance activity within the prescribed area requires a 30 Metre (100 Foot) Ground Disturbance Permit. A Pipeline Proximity (Crossing) Installation Permit or “Proximity Permit” may also be required for installations or crossings within the right-of-way. Both permits are granted by Trans Mountain and begin with a safety assessment, which can be initiated by contacting your local One Call service.

Learn more on our permitting page here.

A Proximity Permit is typically required for installations or crossings within the right-of-way. Proximity Permits are also required for landscaping and storing materials within the right-of-way boundaries or 7.5 metres (25 feet) from the pipeline (whichever is greater).

Learn more on our permitting page here.

We require you to have a valid One Call ticket and all applicable permits at your worksite. If your project is delayed or the scope of work changes, you must contact both your local One Call service and our Pipeline Protection Department and provide details of the proposed changes.

If the weather or anything else impacts the line locating markings or flags, please contact us and request to have the pipeline marked again. Once the line is marked, you are responsible for ensuring the markings are clearly visible and are not disturbed or moved.

Permits, including a valid One Call ticket, must be posted at the job site. If you’re not sure a One Call has been made, ask your foreman to provide the One Call ticket.

During the planning stages, we can provide drawings detailing the right-of-way, however, these drawings cannot be used for any ground disturbance activity and you will be required to sign a disclaimer. A Trans Mountain representative must be on-site for any work within 7.5 metres (25 feet) of the pipeline. Please contact our Pipeline Protection Department to obtain a drawing.

No. We typically provide this service at no cost to you. However, if a Trans Mountain representative is required to be on-site for an extended length of time, a charge may be levied. This information will be detailed in the Pipeline Proximity (Crossing) Installation Permit application process.

Yes. A 30 Metre (100 Foot) Ground Disturbance Permit is required for any ground disturbance activity within 30 metres (100 feet) from the centre of the pipe. This will be provided to you during the required safety meeting. You will be required to keep both permits at the worksite along with your valid One Call ticket.

Applications typically take seven to 10 business days to process. You will be notified by a Trans Mountain representative once your application has been approved.

Many activities and projects can be undertaken near the pipeline, but before you begin any work, the first step is always to contact your local One Call serivce. This is a FREE service. If your proposed work is within 30 metres (100 feet) of our pipeline, a Trans Mountain representative will call you back within three business days in Canada (two in Washington state) to arrange to meet with you on-site, mark our pipeline and issue a 30 Metre (100 Foot) Ground Disturbance Permit.

Complete a One Call notification at clickbeforeyoudig.com.

For everyone’s safety, we don’t allow certain activities on the right-of-way. These include, but are not limited to:

  • Constructing buildings, foundation walls, decks or concrete patios, or other structures, such as sheds
  • Installing any type of swimming pools or hot tubs
  • Using explosives
  • Burning waste material
  • Storing flammable materials, equipment or bulk goods
  • Growing or planting large or deep-rooted vegetation or trees

In Canada, the Trans Mountain Pipeline system is regulated by the Canada Energy Regulator (CER). CER regulations for working in proximity to our pipelines ensure their continued safe operation and protect the public, property and the environment. For more information visit the CER website.

In the United States, the Trans Mountain Puget Sound Pipeline is regulated by the US Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA). PHMSA regulations for working in proximity to our pipelines ensure their continued safe operation and protect the public, property and the environment. For more information visit the PHMSA website.

NPMS is an online database containing the locations and information on pipelines regulated by US Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) in the United States. PHMSA uses this database for emergency response, pipeline inspections, regulatory management, compliance and analysis purposes. Government officials, pipeline operators and the general public also use NPMS for emergency response planning, smart growth planning, critical infrastructure protection and environmental protection. To access NPMS, please visit the NPMS website.

No matter how minor the damage may appear, if you come in contact with the pipeline, you must immediately contact our 24-hour emergency line at 1.888.876.6711.

NEVER COVER IT UP!

Even slight damage – a gouge, a dent, a scrape – can impact the structural integrity of the pipeline. Never attempt to repair it yourself. It takes a qualified Trans Mountain technician to inspect and repair any damage. In the case of an emergency excavation, notify the local One Call service to request an emergency locate.

LEAVE AREA immediately, on foot, crosswind and then upwind

  • Abandon any mechanized equipment being used in or near the area
  • Call Trans Mountain’s 24-hour emergency line 1.888.876.6711
  • Warn others away
  • Eliminate ignition sources (keyless door entry, cell phone or flashlight)
  • Turn off vehicle engines

DO NOT:

  • Re-enter the area
  • Ring door bells or metal knockers; instead knock with your hand to avoid sparks
  • Operate pipeline valves
  • Touch any liquid or vapour
  • Start your vehicle or drive into the release location or vapour clouds while leaving the area
  • Try to extinguish any fires associated with the release; wait for trained professionals

In the unlikely event of an emergency, we will ensure all affected stakeholders are notified promptly. We will work with local first responders to provide appropriate emergency communications and make sure public protection measures are being taken.

The most common immediate response actions for pipeline emergencies are shelter-in-place or evacuation. The decision to take either action is based upon multiple factors, including location of the emergency, potential exposure during evacuation, anticipated duration of the emergency and advice from emergency responders and/or Trans Mountain representatives.

To learn more about our Emergency Management program click here.

Although rare, pipeline spills require immediate action and caution. The Trans Mountain Pipeline ships a variety of potentially hazardous crude oil products and a number of potential hazards are associated with an unintended release from the pipeline. Products may be flammable and explosive under certain conditions and may also pose serious risks to health through inhalation, absorption, physical contact and/or ingestion. Exposure may lead to irritation of the upper respiratory tracts, headaches, nausea, loss of appetite, drowsiness, vomiting, loss of consciousness or even death.

If you live or work near our facility, you may occasionally smell petroleum odours. Although we take measures to control odours, at times they may be present from normal operations or routine maintenance. However, odours can also be an indication of a pipeline emergency. Any potential emergency, including odours, should be reported to our 24-Hour emergency line: 1.888.876.6711.

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