On November 29, 2016, the Government of Canada granted approval for the Trans Mountain Expansion Project (the Project). On May 19, 2016, following a 29-month review, the National Energy Board (NEB) concluded the Project is in the Canadian public interest and recommended the Federal Governor in Council approve the expansion. These approvals will allow the Project to proceed with 157 conditions. In addition, the British Columbia Environmental Assessment Office (BC EAO) issued an environmental assessment certificate for the Trans Mountain Expansion Project. Upon receipt of the Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity (CPCN), Trans Mountain plans to begin construction in September 2017 and go into service in 2019.

Operating and building pipeline infrastructure affects many along the route. We recognize the potential impact to our neighbours and communities near operating areas.

We work with landowners along our pipeline network. Our key objective is to treat each landowner fairly and equitably. For those who may be directly affected by the Expansion Project, we’ll identify and address landowners’ concerns and questions. These landowners will then work with the Land Teams to reach jointly equitable solutions.

The NEB has produced a guide for landowners and the public that provides details about the regulatory process governing pipeline projects. This information is available on the NEB website.

In cases where we aren’t able to reach a mutually agreeable settlement with a landowner, the NEB will provide a multi-step process to address differences of opinions as part of the routing review and approval process. Where Trans Mountain does acquire land rights for the Expansion Project, landowners are entitled to compensation for the lands used, both for short-term construction and permanent easement, in addition to damages or inconvenience. This compensation is in addition to our legal requirement and corporate commitment to minimize damages and restore lands as far as practicable to pre-construction conditions. 

It is important to note that pipeline companies such as Trans Mountain do not have the right to expropriate land from landowners – under the National Energy Board Act, pipeline companies are only able to apply to obtain right-of-entry for lands required for a project after NEB approval. If we’re not able to reach a mutually acceptable agreement with a landowner, the NEB has established a rigorous and objective process to protect the rights of landowners while considering the needs of the Project. Our objective is to not displace anyone from their home or business as a result of the expansion.