January 15, 2022, 8:45 am PDT

The Trans Mountain Pipeline has returned to normal operating pressure.

The pipeline has been operating at a reduced capacity since Sunday, December 5, 2021, when it was safely restarted following a 21-day precautionary shutdown as a result of heavy rains and flooding in British Columbia and Washington state.

The return to full pressure follows the preparation of a comprehensive engineering assessment and the acceptance of Trans Mountain’s plan for return to normal operations with the Canada Energy Regulator.

December 15, 2021, 9:30 am PDT

Just over one week since the Trans Mountain Pipeline was safely returned to service, gasoline and crude oil continue to flow to Trans Mountain’s customers in Kamloops, Burnaby and Washington state.

While operating the pipeline at reduced capacity has begun to ease the disruption to motor fuel supply to the region, more than 400 people remain involved in the response – both on the ground and in Trans Mountain’s incident command post. With ground access to all sites now established, crews are focused on coating repairs in preparation for backfilling exposed areas, berm fortification and planning to return to full capacity. Trans Mountain will continue with these emergency works throughout the winter period to fortify the pipeline right-of-way in preparation for spring runoff. The teams are focused on the reinstatement of sites impacted by heavy rains and flooding in the regions north of Hope and south of Merritt.

Throughout the shutdown period, the pipeline remained safely in a static condition and there was no indication of any product release or serious damage to the pipe. The pipeline was restarted on Sunday, December 5, at a reduced capacity following a 21-day shutdown.

Trans Mountain utilized its Expansion Project and operational crews and equipment to reinstate access to the pipeline lost due to damaged roads, changes in river flows and adverse weather. Hundreds of people worked around the clock to clear highways, build bridges and manage watercourses to allow for access and repairs to the pipeline.

In addition to the restart efforts, our workforce - including our contractor teams - utilized our people and our equipment throughout the Fraser Valley, Coquihalla and BC Interior regions to assist those most in need. Our efforts included providing transportation, fuel, food and water in the days following the flooding.

December 5, 2021, 12:20 pm PDT

The Trans Mountain Pipeline was safely restarted today.

As part of this process Trans Mountain will monitor the line on the ground, by air and through our technology systems operated by our control centre.

The restart comes following the completion of all necessary assessments, repairs, and construction of protective earthworks needed for the pipeline to be returned to service. Over the coming weeks Trans Mountain will continue with additional emergency work.

December 4, 2021, 12:00 pm PDT

Following the precautionary shutdown of the Trans Mountain Pipeline as a result of heavy rains and flooding, Trans Mountain plans to restart the pipeline tomorrow.

Throughout the shutdown period, the pipeline remained safely in a static condition and there was no indication of any product release or serious damage to the pipe. Trans Mountain completed detailed investigations of the pipe’s integrity and geotechnical assessments of the surrounding landscape to confirm readiness to restart the line. Restarting the pipeline has required a significant, sustained effort to reinstate access lost due to damaged roads, changes in river flows, and adverse weather. Crews worked around the clock to clear highways, build bridges and manage watercourses to allow for access and repairs to the pipeline.

We expect that all assessments, repairs and protective earthworks necessary for a safe restart will be completed by tomorrow and plans have been developed and shared with the Canada Energy Regulator.

Subject to CER concurrence and final repair work, the restart will take place during daylight hours tomorrow and the pipe will be closely monitored by our teams in the field and technology systems operated by our Control Centre. Emergency management teams and equipment remain staged in key areas with booms proactively deployed in the unlikely event of a release.

Over the coming weeks Trans Mountain will continue with additional emergency work. Some of this work includes conducting additional inline inspection, armouring of riverbanks and adding ground cover or relocating sections of the pipeline.

December 1, 2021, 11:30 am PDT

With continued storms bringing heavy rain causing water accumulation, crews are continually monitoring and assessing the pipeline and so far, there are no new areas of concern caused by the weather conditions. Where work has been done to shore-up banks, we are making improvements such as berm fortification to ensure the work already done is holding.

Trans Mountain has brought in more than 44,000 cubic metres of rock and gravel at critical sites and deployed several hundred sandbags to assist with shoring-up banks in flooded areas to allow the required assessment and repair work to continue. Crews are utilizing 30 sets of pumps and hoses to manage water accumulation and have set up 15 separate light-stands with generators to allow monitoring and work to continue around the clock.

We are continually assessing conditions in the region and are deploying additional resources where necessary. More than 470 people, six helicopters and some 100 pieces of heavy equipment, including three pieces of snow maintenance equipment and three sidebooms are in the Coquihalla and Coldwater regions to support getting the pipeline restarted.

We have natural hazard assessments ongoing and are focused on supporting our field teams who are working day and night in dynamic wet weather conditions near high-energy river flows. Safety of our crews and protection of the pipeline system remain our top priorities and despite the adverse conditions we are moving forward with work necessary to safely restart the pipeline.

Provided there are no additional setbacks from the latest round of rainstorms, Trans Mountain will soon complete work that needs to be done before a restart can take place. Based on current conditions and the amount of progress we have been able to make, we are only a few days away from restarting the pipeline at a reduced capacity.

November 29, 2021, 2:45 pm PDT

This past weekend, progress continued towards a safe restart of the pipeline. However heavy rains impacted air and ground access and caused substantial accumulation of water in some areas where work is underway. Work was interrupted at some sites on Sunday November 28, 2021 due to high water or lack of access. Assessments of the impacts of the latest storm are being undertaken today with a focus on the Coldwater and Coquihalla regions. While early reports indicate much of the work to protect the worksites held up well, crews continue to reinforce berms and are continuing to improve ground access.

Based on current conditions and the amount of progress we have been able to make in the face of continued challenges with weather and access, we are still days away from restarting the pipeline at a reduced capacity. Once restarted, delivery of oil and refined products currently in the line will continue as they progress to their delivery points at either Kamloops, Sumas, or Burnaby. After initial start-up, a sustained effort will continue to return the system to its full capacity as soon as possible.

The Trans Mountain Pipeline is a critical piece of infrastructure for British Columbia and Washington state and every effort is being made to safely restart the pipeline as promptly as possible. Trans Mountain does not own the product transported in the pipeline. We are the only pipeline in North America that carries both refined products and crude oil. Depending on the needs of Trans Mountain’s customers, the amount of product shipped to four general destinations: Kamloops Terminal, Burnaby Terminal, Westridge Marine Terminal or Washington State refineries, varies from week to week.

November 26, 2021, 2:15 pm PDT

The Trans Mountain Pipeline remains shut down following a voluntary, precautionary shut down on Sunday, November 14, in anticipation of the impacts of the heavy rainfall and extreme weather conditions.

Trans Mountain has made considerable progress towards a safe restart of the pipeline. Based on current conditions and the amount of progress we have been able to make in the face of continued challenges with weather and access, we are working towards restarting the pipeline at a reduced capacity early to mid-next week. Once restarted, delivery of oil and refined products currently in the line will continue as they progress to their delivery points at either Kamloops, Sumas, or Burnaby. After initial start-up, a sustained effort will continue to return the system to its full capacity as soon as possible.

The Trans Mountain Pipeline is a critical piece of infrastructure for British Columbia and Washington state and every effort is being made to safely restart the pipeline as promptly as possible. Trans Mountain is in regular contact with its shippers and is working to mitigate potential impacts of the pipeline shut down on the region.

Trans Mountain does not own the product transported in the pipeline. We are the only pipeline in North America that carries both refined products and crude oil. Depending on the needs of Trans Mountain’s customers, the amount of product shipped to four general destinations: Kamloops Terminal, Burnaby Terminal, Westridge Marine Terminal or Washington State refineries, varies from week to week.

November 25, 2021, 1:00 pm PDT

The Trans Mountain Pipeline remains shut down following a voluntary, precautionary shut down on Sunday, November 14, in anticipation of the impacts of the heavy rainfall and extreme weather conditions.

With the continued deterioration of weather conditions in the region in the coming days, Trans Mountain is closely monitoring the situation to ensure our crews can continue to progress safely, particularly in areas still dependent on air support for access and provision of supplies and equipment.

Trans Mountain has added snow maintenance equipment – two plows and two snowcats – to the list of heavy equipment already engaged in the response. More than 400 people, seven helicopters and some 100 pieces of heavy equipment in the Coquihalla and Coldwater regions, focused on getting the pipeline restarted.

The pipeline remains safely in a static condition and there is no indication of any loss of containment or serious damage to the pipe. Our focus has shifted to complete repairs to ensure integrity of the line where it has been exposed and impacted by flooding and debris. In preparation of this work, we have staged necessary materials and supplies in the area, and we continue efforts to improve ground and air access into parts of the Coquihalla and Coldwater Valley isolated by highway damage.

Work continues to progress towards a safe restart of the pipeline, in a reduced capacity. Key to successful execution of the restart plan will be access for equipment, fair weather, and no new findings of concern. A sustained effort will continue to return the system to its full capacity.

November 24, 2021, 2:30 pm PDT

The Trans Mountain Pipeline remains shut down following a voluntary, precautionary shut down on Sunday, November 14, in anticipation of the impacts of the heavy rainfall and extreme weather conditions.

With the weather conditions expected to deteriorate in the region in the coming days, Trans Mountain is closely monitoring the situation to ensure our crews can continue to progress safely, particularly in areas still dependant on air support for access and provision of supplies and equipment.

Trans Mountain has set up seven staging areas in the most affected areas, including two dedicated to helicopter operations, to act as bases for equipment and resources. Our response includes more than 400 people, seven helicopters and some 100 pieces of heavy equipment in the Coquihalla and Coldwater regions, focused on getting the pipeline restarted.

With the majority of on-the-ground assessments of the pipeline’s condition completed, our focus is shifting to complete repairs to ensure integrity of the line where it has been exposed and impacted by flooding and debris. In preparation of this work, we have staged necessary materials and supplies in the area, and we continue efforts to improve ground and air access into parts of the Coquihalla and Coldwater Valley isolated by highway damage.

The pipeline remains safely in a static condition and there is no indication of any loss of containment or serious damage to the pipe. We are documenting and have begun to repair locations where the pipeline has been exposed, its protective coating has been scoured by debris, and, in some cases where surface dents and scratches on the outside of the pipe have occurred.

If all work continues to progress and no further issues with the pipeline are identified, Trans Mountain is optimistic that we can safely restart the pipeline, in a reduced capacity, by the end of the week. Key to successful execution of the restart plan will be access for equipment, fair weather, and no new findings of concern. A sustained effort will continue to return the system to its full capacity.

The Trans Mountain Pipeline is a critical piece of infrastructure for British Columbia and Washington State and every effort is being made to safely restart the pipeline as promptly as possible. This is the longest period the pipeline has been shut down in its nearly 70-year history. Trans Mountain is in regular contact with its shippers and is working in cooperation with the Province to mitigate the effects of the pipeline shut down on the region.

We are in contact with Federal and Provincial agencies including Emergency Management British Columbia and continue to offer our support and assistance where possible.

November 23, 2021, 12:30 pm PDT

The Trans Mountain Pipeline remains shut down following a voluntary, precautionary shut down on Sunday, November 14, in anticipation of the impacts of the heavy rainfall and extreme weather conditions.

Crews are nearing completion of the remaining ground evaluations of the pipeline, as expected, in the Coquihalla and Coldwater regions. Much of the work to re-divert watercourses where flooding resulted in water flows on the right-of-way has been completed. A critical temporary bridge is nearing completion. Trans Mountain teams worked through the night to accelerate this work in the face of worsening weather.

Trans Mountain has set up seven staging areas in the most affected areas, including two dedicated to helicopter operations, to act as bases for equipment and resources. Our response includes more than 400 people, seven helicopters and some 100 pieces of heavy equipment in the Coquihalla and Coldwater regions, focused on getting the pipeline restarted.

Trans Mountain has completed surveys of the Puget Sound portion of the pipeline system and is also working with U.S. officials to restart a small section of the Puget Sound Pipeline within Washington State to move oil currently held in tanks at Trans Mountain’s Laurel Station to Cherry Point for processing. The amount of product we expect to deliver is limited to a small amount of crude already in that portion of the line.

The pipeline remains safely in a static condition and there is no indication of any loss of containment. Trans Mountain has deployed spill-response equipment at our pre-determined control points, including safety boom in river areas near to or downstream from where we are working.

If all planning and work continues to progress and no further issues with the pipeline are assessed, Trans Mountain is optimistic that we can restart the pipeline, in some capacity, by the end of the week. Key to successful execution of the restart plan will be access for equipment, fair weather, and no new findings of concern.

The Trans Mountain Pipeline is a critical piece of infrastructure for British Columbia and Washington state and every effort is being made to safely restart the pipeline as promptly as possible. This is the longest period the pipeline has been shut down in its nearly 70-year history. Trans Mountain is in regular contact with its shippers and is working in cooperation with the Province to mitigate the effects of the pipeline shut down on the region.

We are in contact with Federal and Provincial agencies including Emergency Management British Columbia and continue to offer our support and assistance where possible.

November 22, 2021, 12:20 pm PDT

Trans Mountain has more than 350 people working around the clock to safely restart the Trans Mountain Pipeline. The pipeline remains shut down following a voluntary, precautionary shut down on Sunday, November 14, in anticipation of the impacts of the heavy rainfall and extreme weather conditions.

Over the weekend, crews continued with efforts to fully evaluate the pipe in the affected areas, with teams being airlifted or hiking into areas where there is still no road access. Ground inspections have been completed at many sites and Trans Mountain expects to complete the remainder by the end of day today, weather permitting.

Key response areas


Trans Mountain is utilizing six helicopters and some 80 pieces of heavy equipment in the Coquihalla and Coldwater regions clearing roads, installing temporary bridges and re-diverting watercourses. In some areas where the flooding resulted in water flows on the right-of-way, the rivers need to be re-directed back to their normal channel to allow Trans Mountain to assess and support the pipeline.

The pipeline remains safely in a static condition and there is no indication of any loss of containment. As a precaution until the assessment phase is completed, Trans Mountain has deployed spill-response equipment at our pre-determined control points, including containment boom in river areas near to or downstream from where we are working.

If all planning and work continues to progress and no further issues with the pipeline are assessed, Trans Mountain is optimistic that we can restart the pipeline, in some capacity, by the end of the week. Key to successful execution of the restart plan will be access for equipment, fair weather, and no new findings of concern.

The Trans Mountain Pipeline is a critical piece of infrastructure for British Columbia and Washington state and every effort is being made to safely restart the pipeline as promptly as possible. This is the longest period the pipeline has been shut down in its nearly 70-year history. Trans Mountain is in regular contact with its shippers and is working in cooperation with the Province to mitigate the effects of the pipeline shut down on the region.

Work on the Trans Mountain Expansion Project continues along unaffected parts of the pipeline corridor and at Terminals – with crews in the Coquihalla and Merritt regions being redeployed to assist with efforts to re-open highways and to get the Trans Mountain Pipeline restarted. We are in contact with Federal and Provincial agencies including Emergency Management British Columbia and continue to offer our support and assistance where possible.

November 19, 2021, 3:30 pm PDT

The Trans Mountain Pipeline remains shut down following a voluntary precautionary shut down on Sunday, November 14, in anticipation of the impacts of the heavy rainfall and extreme weather conditions. The pipeline remains safely in a static condition and there is no indication of any loss of containment.

Trans Mountain has more than 200 people dedicated around the clock to getting the pipeline back up and running. Teams are beginning helicopter operations in the Coldwater region to remove fallen trees and debris that are hampering detailed inspection of the pipeline in that area. Another key priority remains getting ground access to the affected areas, and we are actively assisting the BC Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure with getting roads cleared.

Crews and equipment working to clear debris on Highway 1

There are multiple areas of the pipeline between Hope and Merritt where pipeline cover needs to be restored and there are other sections that we may decide to cut-out and replace entirely, for example long sections that have been fully exposed to river course changes. As a precaution, Trans Mountain is deploying spill-response equipment trailers to areas where we will be working.

If all planning and work continues to progress and no further issues with the pipeline are assessed, Trans Mountain is optimistic that we can restart the pipeline, in some capacity, by the end of next week. Key to successful execution of the restart plan will be access for equipment, fair weather, and no new findings of concern.

The Trans Mountain Pipeline is a critical piece of infrastructure for British Columbia and Washington state and every effort is being made to safely restart the pipeline as promptly as possible. This is the longest period the pipeline has been shut down in its nearly 70-year history. Trans Mountain is in regular contact with its shippers and is working in cooperation with the Province to mitigate the effects of the pipeline shut down on the region.

Work on the Trans Mountain Expansion Project continues in many areas along the pipeline corridor – and crews in the Coquihalla and Merritt regions have been redeployed to assist with efforts to get the Trans Mountain Pipeline restarted.

We are in contact with Emergency Management British Columbia and continue to offer our support and assistance where possible.

November 18, 2021, 11:25 am PDT

The Trans Mountain Pipeline remains shut down following a precautionary shut down on Sunday, November 14, in anticipation of the impacts of the heavy rainfall and extreme weather conditions. The pipeline remains safely in a static condition and there is no indication of any oil release.

The Trans Mountain Pipeline is a critical piece of infrastructure for British Columbia and Washington state and every effort is being made to safely restart the pipeline as promptly as possible. Trans Mountain is in regular contact with its shippers and is working to mitigate potential impacts of the pipeline shut down on the region.

Trans Mountain is focusing its efforts in the region between Chilliwack and Merritt where weather had the most affect and utilizing both our Expansion Project and operational resources to work towards restarting the pipeline. While a number of activities are underway simultaneously, a key priority is to get access to the affected areas, and we are actively assisting the BC Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure with getting roads cleared.

Crews continued to make progress yesterday with assessments of the pipeline by air and on the ground, but access to some areas is still hampered by debris and washed-out roads and bridges. Restarting requires geotechnical evaluations of slope stability and on-the-ground analysis to determine if there is work required before we can safely resume operations. There are some areas where Trans Mountain will need to restore cover over the pipe or make other repairs to ensure integrity of the line where it has been exposed due to flooding.

Work on the Trans Mountain Expansion Project continues in many areas along the pipeline corridor – and crews in the Coquihalla and Merritt regions have been redeployed to assist with efforts to get the Trans Mountain Pipeline restarted. We are in contact with Emergency Management British Columbia and continue to offer our support and assistance where possible. We continue to assist the broader affected communities by clearing access roads, providing air transport for supplies and critical evacuations for medical incidents and offering beds at our Merritt Camp Community to local first responders and Indigenous communities.


November 17, 2021, 12:00 pm PDT

The Trans Mountain Pipeline remains shut down following a precautionary shut down on Sunday, November 14, in response to heavy rainfall and extreme weather conditions.

Trans Mountain has a team working on plans to restart the pipeline and completed an initial assessment of the affected areas by air yesterday. The plans for restarting require continued assessments, including geotechnical evaluations of slope stability and on-the-ground analysis to determine if there is work required to repair or re-establish protective cover where the pipe has been exposed due to flooding.

Trans Mountain is in regular contact with its shippers and is working to mitigate potential impacts of the pipeline shut down on British Columbians.

Work on the Trans Mountain Expansion Project continues in areas unaffected by extreme weather. In the Fraser Valley and the Coquihalla regions, crews are assisting communities and local authorities with road clearing and providing equipment and resources wherever possible.

Trans Mountain has a strong, capable workforce with experience and expertise in responding to all kinds of emergency situations. We have crews and equipment throughout the Fraser Valley, Coquihalla and BC Interior regions as part of the Expansion Project and regular operations. We are in contact with Emergency Management British Columbia and have offered our support and assistance in any way we can including offering beds at our camp community in Merritt to evacuees.


November 16, 2021, 1:20 pm PDT

As a precaution, Trans Mountain safely shut down the Trans Mountain Pipeline in response to heavy rainfall and extreme weather conditions. The pipeline remains shut down due to widespread flooding and debris flows in British Columbia and Washington state. In order to restart the pipeline, we need to complete an assessment of the system in affected areas and are undertaking that work by air and on the ground.

Construction on the Trans Mountain Expansion Project remains stood down in the Fraser Valley, Coquihalla, and Interior regions of BC affected by the weather event. Inspections of these worksites and equipment are underway, and construction will restart when it is safe and practical to do so.

Our thoughts are with the communities and people affected by the flooding. Trans Mountain is in contact with Emergency Management British Columbia and have offered our support and assistance in any way we can including offering beds at our camp community in Merritt to evacuees.

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